Past Features

February 26, 2016

SEIDARM Goes Tactical
Security system can now be deployed quickly


Somewhere in the desert - Feb. 26 - Chad Knaeble prepares remote cameras used in test of mobile SEIDARM security system. (See photo of system)
Sierra Vista Herald / Review -- February 25, 2016  
Company tests mobile version of border monitoring system
    The creators of a locally developed technology designed to detect border incursions by land and air are testing a scaled-down version that can be deployed temporarily.
    The SEIDARM system uses a combination of seismic monitoring, radar and geolocation to identify and distinguish human, vehicle and aircraft activity hundreds of feet out from buried ground sensors connected by a network of underground cables.
    Originally developed to be placed permanently along borders and surrounding other protected areas or facilities and remain active for years at a time, this new modification of the system retains all of the original's capabilities while using battery and solar power to gain the added benefit of being able to be used in limited, tactical locations, said Glenn Spencer of Border Technology, Inc., which developed the system.
    Border Technology will work in concert with the end user, with whatever they want or need. There could be applications for those that want to know where their cows or other animals might be crossing. Think of a wild animal sanctuary,” said Greg Voss, who helped develop the algorithm that SEIDARM uses to distinguish what is creating the seismic activity detected by ground sensors.
    The system was developed over the last several years, and prototypes buried more than three years ago near Spencer's property along the border are still producing data. Though Voss was said there was still progress to be made. [...]
    “Border Technology will work in concert with the end user, with whatever they want or need. There could be applications for those that want to know where their cows or other animals might be crossing. Think of a wild animal sanctuary,” said Greg Voss, who helped develop the algorithm that SEIDARM uses to distinguish what is creating the seismic activity detected by ground sensors.
    “By definition, an engineer is a perfectionist, so it's never done. Could it be deployed now and be useful? Yes. Could it be, with time and energy, made better? Of course,” he said.
    Border Technology is still shopping the SEIDARM system around to governments and private companies. While they had yet to settle on a price range for the new mobile version of the system, the version designed to be permanently installed in a single location ranged in cost from $120,000 and $130,000 per mile, Spencer said.“Once this is set up, you can be anywhere and get the alarm, pull out your laptop and see where the intrusion is taking place, whether it be human, vehicle or aircraft.” --- Glenn Spencer, of Border Technology, Inc.

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