Past Features

November 1, 2016

Note: Owning to budget restrictions, for while ABP will re-run daily
features that were particularly good. This is from August 29, 2016.
High Tech Border
Big successes --- or boondoggles?
Salon Magazine   
The great Mexican wall deception: Trump's America already exists on the border
    ....The post-9/11 border is now both a war zone and a showcase for corporate surveillance. It represents, according to Border Patrol agent Felix Chavez, an “unprecedented deployment of resources,” any of which could have led to Sarabia's capture. It could have been one of the hundreds of remote video or mobile surveillance systems, or one of the more than 12,000 implanted motion sensors that set off alarms in hidden operational control rooms where agents stare into large monitors.
    It could have been the spy towers made by the Israeli company Elbit Systems that spotted him, or Predator B drones built by General Atomics, or VADER radar systems manufactured by the defense giant Northrup Grumman that, like so many similar technologies, have been transported from the battlefields of Afghanistan or Iraq to the U.S. border.

Glenn Spencer -- American Border Patrol
High tech border, but does it work?
    Salon Magazine is touting the use of technology on the border.
    Let's take a closer look at what they mention.
Remote Video Surveillance Cameras
A Review of Remote Surveillance
Technology Along U.S. Land Borders

    RVS cameras do not have the ability to detect movement. Therefore, illegal activity may go unnoticed unless OBP personnel happen to be monitoring video terminals at the time an illegal crossing is in progress.
Comment by American Border Patrol
 
   Without being alerted as to where to point them remote surveillance cameras are almost useless. A system called SEIDARM solves this problem, but DHS/CBP has refused to seriously consider its use.
Note: See the latest SEIDARM success --- ignored by the media.
12,000 implanted sensors
    "...we determined that more than 90 percent of the responses to sensor alerts resulted in 'false alarms' --- something other than illegal alien activity, such as local traffic, outbound traffic, a train or animals." -- DHS Inspector General, 2006
Spy towers made by the Israeli company Elbit Systems
    DHS has installed a number of Elbit “spy towers”. American Border Patrol examined six such towers installed near Nogales, Arizona, and found that three were essentially blind. -- (See video)
Predator B drones built by General Atomics
Audit: DHS Drone Program Ineffective at Border Security

 
   Drones were also responsible for only 1.8 percent of apprehensions in the Tucson, Ariz. region, and a mere 0.7 percent in the Rio Grande Valley.
    “According to border patrol agents and intelligence personnel in Arizona, USBP probably would have detected the people using ground-based assets, without the assistance of unmanned aircraft,” the audit said.
VADER radar systems manufactured by the defense giant Northrup Grumman
    The jury is still out on VADER, however it must be noted that it is mounted on a Predator drone that it detects people on the ground directly beneath its flight path. As it moves on, so do the people.
    One result of using VADER was to challenge the apprehension rate claimed by DHS.
New drone radar reveals Border Patrol ‘gotaways' in high numbers
   “The U.S. Border Patrol has caught a fraction of the border crossers spotted by a sophisticated sensor mounted on unmanned spy aircraft and flown over remote stretches of desert, casting doubts on claims that the area is more secure than ever, according to documents obtained by the Center for Investigative Reporting.”
See Operation Gotaway

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