Past Features

October 31, 2017

Securing the border:
Debate -- or just do it?

American Patrol Report: Mexico Confirms Amnesty-Induced Surge
Heritage Fdn. -- October 30, 2017
Dreaming of Amnesty: Legalization Will Spur More Illegal Immigration
   
 Congress is considering legislation that would provide amnesty to those brought illegally to the U.S. as minors, including those who may not have been eligible for the DACA program. One such example is the SUCCEED Act. Such legislative efforts are fundamentally flawed and will encourage more illegal immigration. Rather than implementing amnesty, Congress should focus on a step-by-step process to enhance enforcement of existing immigration laws, improve the immigration system, and institute reliable border security.
Key Takeaways
    Proposals to provide legal status to those brought to the U.S. illegally as minors must contend with the fundamental problems facing any amnesty.
    Amnesty legislation for illegal immigrants will likely encourage more illegal immigration, as has happened in the past.
    These proposals also kick the can down the road on essential reforms while rewarding those who have broken U.S. laws at the expense of those who obey them.
    The Trump Administration announced on September 5 that it was rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) administrative amnesty program, with a six-month wind-down period.
    DACA provided almost 800,000 illegal immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as minors (through the age of 15) with renewable protection from deportation and a pseudo-legal status that allowed the recipient to receive government benefits, such as work authorization and a social security number.
    Attorney General Jeff Sessions, in ending the program (which is now down to 690,000 beneficiaries), declared it “an unconstitutional exercise of authority by the executive branch.”
    In 2016, the courts ruled against the broader Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) program, which provided the same type of benefits to different groups of illegal aliens. This left the legally similar DACA indefensible as a matter of law.
    Congress is considering legislation that would provide amnesty to those brought illegally to the U.S. as minors, including those who may not have been eligible for the DACA program. One such example is the Solution for Undocumented Children through Careers, Employment, Education, and Defending Our Nation (SUCCEED) Act introduced by Senators James Lankford (R–OK), Tom Tillis (R–NC), and Orrin Hatch (R–UT).
    Such legislative efforts are fundamentally flawed and will encourage more illegal immigration. Rather than implementing amnesty, Congress should focus on a step-by-step process to enhance immigration enforcement and improve the legal immigration system.
Fundamental Problems
    Any legislation that provides lawful status to an alien who is unlawfully present in the U.S.— that is, amnesty — raises three fundamental questions. Does such legislation:
    1). Encourage more illegal immigration, or discourage it?
    2). Guarantee long-term commitment to a working immigration system or kick the can down the road?
    3).  Uphold the rule of law or weaken it?

Glenn Spencer -- October 31,, 2017
How many angels?
 
   The debate over the minutiae of immigration enforcement has gone on for decades. It is sort of like asking: How many angels can dance on the head of a pin?
    "The question has also been linked to the fall of Constantinople, with the imagery of scholars debating about minutiae while the Turks besieged the city."
    Since the debate over the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, millions have flooded across the border and stayed - or were more were born here and made citizens - and the debate continues.
  It is time to take a stand. President Trump should force members of congress to take a stand --- vote to secure the border first --- or face a primary challenge.
    It is time to stop counting angels.

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