Past Features

December 28, 2017

A look Back at Border
Technology News

American Border Patrol: September 13, 2015 --- Elbit Integrated Fixed Tower near Nogales, Arizona. (See Larger Image)
Glenn Spencer -- December 28, 2017
The Year in Review: Integrated Fixed Towers  
    The following is a summary of 2017 news stories that included the term "Integrated Fixed Towers".
    American Border Patrol first raised the issue of Integrated Fixed Towers two years ago.
    The fair observer would have to conclude that only the last story --- "Glenn's War" --- was in any way critical of this technology.
    Time will tell if ABP was on the money - while Wired, Popular Mechanics, Tucson News, Fronteras, Arizona Public Media and NPR missed the real Integrated Fixed Towers story completely.

Wired -- January 19, 2017
A WALL ALONE CAN'T SECURE THE BORDER, NO MATTER WHO PAYS FOR IT  
    The agency reported to Congress in 2016 that its Integrated Fixed Towers program was ready to progress after a required audit showed that towers were meeting their "operational requirements.”
Popular Mechanics -- January 28, 2016   
Better Than a Wall: A New Detection System Can Help Monitor the U.S.-Mexico Border
    The Integrated Fixed Towers (IFT) system, which includes radar and day and night cameras mounted on a series of towers along the border, promises to solve the problem.
Tucson News Now -- Feb. 8, 2017   
VIRTUAL WALL: Technology helping secure US-Mexico border  
 
   Integrated Fixed Towers, or IFTs, are solar powered and equipped with radar and infrared technology sensitive enough to single out body heat.
    The cameras are precise enough to allow agents to determine whether movement is coming from an armed drug smuggler, a hiker or even wildlife.

Fronteras Desk -- April 25, 2017  
The Border's New Boundaries: Digital Towers   
    The agency uses two types of towers: integrated fixed towers (IFTs), which use ground sensor surveillance in rural parts of the Mexican border, and remote video surveillance systems, which are used in urban areas where legal traffic is heavy enough to render ground sensors useless.
AZPM -- May 3, 2017
The Border's New Boundaries, Part I: Digital Towers  
    The agency uses two types of towers: integrated fixed towers (IFT), which use ground sensor surveillance in rural parts of the Mexican border, and remote video surveillance systems, which are used in urban areas where legal traffic is heavy enough to render ground sensors useless.
AZPM -- July 25, 2017    
Border Officials Praise Technology, Ask for More   
    “Integrated, fixed towers deployed along the border in Arizona provide a long-range, persistent surveillance. These tower systems automatically detect and track items of interest and provide centralized operators with video and geospatial location of items of interest,” said Scott Luck, acting deputy chief of the Border Patrol.
NPR -- September 15, 2017
Trump Uses Border Security Funding As Condition Of Potential DACA Deal   
    SHAPIRO: What kind of technologies are we talking about, drones or facial identification, surveillance? Like, what's the cutting edge right now?
    BEHLENDORF: Primarily the most deployable technology is surveillance cameras, things that are known as Integrated Fixed Towers, which are a series of camera capabilities and radar and other sensors that provide a wide-area surveillance capability in a lot of under-populated and open areas, especially along the southern border.

Sonoran News -- October 18, 2017   
Glenn's War   
    He believes that the Border Patrol's “digital border” of Integrated Fixed Towers --- giant radar/thermal/camera towers that watch the southern border --- are overpriced at best and a scam at worst. The Border Patrol disagrees.

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